60 Meters

Revised rules for the use of the 60 meter channels

The revised ARRL 60-Meter Recommended Practices document can also be
found in PDF form on the web at,
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Regulatory/Recommended_Practices_Version_6_5.pdf.

As of March 5, US amateurs have new privileges on the 60 meter band. In addition to an increase in effective radiated power from 50 to 100 W, hams can now transmit CW and PSK31 on the following channel-center frequencies:

  • Channel 1: 5332.0 kHz
  • Channel 2: 5348.0 kHz
  • Channel 3: 5358.5 kHz
  • Channel 4: 5373.0 kHz
  • Channel 5: 5405.0 kHz

Amateurs can also transmit USB voice and PACTOR III on the following suppressed carrier frequencies (the frequencies typically shown on transceiver displays):

  • Channel 1: 5330.5 kHz
  • Channel 2: 5346.5 kHz
  • Channel 3: 5357.0 kHz
  • Channel 4: 5371.5 kHz
  • Channel 5: 5403.5 kHz

For more information, please see 60 Meter Operations — New Privileges and Recommended Practices, published by the ARRL HF Band Planning Committee. A revised ARRL band chart is also available. Watch for the article “New Privileges on 60 Meters” by ARRL Regulatory Information Manager Dan Henderson, N1ND, in the April 2012 issue of QST.

The requirement of only one signal per channel remains, as well as
the prohibition against automatic operation. The FCC continues to
require that all digital transmissions be centered on the
channel-center frequencies, which the Report and Order defines as
being 1.5 kHz above the suppressed carrier frequency of a
transceiver operated in the Upper Sideband (USB) mode. This is
typically the frequency shown on the frequency display.

Channel  USB Suppressed Carrier (kHz)    Center (kHz)

1        5330.5                          5332.0

2        5346.5                          5348.0

3        5357.0                          5358.5

4        5371.5                          5373.0

5        5403.5                          5405.0

The ARRL advises amateurs to operate with care when using digital
modes in consideration of the fact that hams are secondary users on
these frequencies. See the revised 60-Meter FAQ page on the ARRL Web
at, http://www.arrl.org/60-meter-faq.

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